Volume 2, Issue 2, April 2017, Page: 45-50
The Influence of Serum Vitamin A on Lung Cancer Risk
Erik Cook, Department of Health Research, LVC Services, Pacoima, USA
Received: Feb. 28, 2017;       Accepted: Mar. 11, 2017;       Published: Mar. 27, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijcocr.20170202.13      View  1731      Downloads  143
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of serum level vitamin A with the incidence of lung cancer (LCa). An analysis, using a prospective study design, was conducted among a cohort of 3,086 men and women, ages 25 to 74 years, from the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey-Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. Using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, inverse associations between serum vitamin A and LCa risk were observed in all models. These findings suggest that increased serum vitamin A may protect against LCa. Additional studies, addressing the limitations encountered in this analysis, are needed to validate the protective role vitamin A may play against LCa risk.
Keywords
Follow-up Studies, Incidence, Lung Neoplasms, Nutrition Surveys, Prospective Studies, Vitamin A
To cite this article
Erik Cook, The Influence of Serum Vitamin A on Lung Cancer Risk, International Journal of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Research. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2017, pp. 45-50. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcocr.20170202.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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